You are here

The Carter Center - Lymphatic Filariasis Elimination Program

This page is part of our report on The Carter Center.

Published: 2009

What do they do?

The Carter Center's Lymphatic Filariasis Elimination Program is part of its integrated program in two states in Nigeria.1 The integrated program simultaneously combats lymphatic filariasis (discussed on this page), river blindness, trachoma, malaria, and schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminths.

The program involves mass administration of two drugs: ivermectin and albendazole (sub-Saharan Africa) or diethylcarbamazine and albendazole (other areas).2

Evidence of effectiveness

General evidence on this program type

Mass administration of ivermectin and albendazole (the drugs the Carter Center administers) has been rigorously shown to reduce lymphatic filariasis infection rates, though direct evidence for this program's effect on symptoms is relatively thin. See our full report on mass distribution of ivermectin and albendazole to eliminate lymphatic filariasis.

Monitoring provided by The Carter Center

The Carter Center surveys residents in its areas of focus in Nigeria to monitor progress. The charts below show the change in prevalence of lymphatic filarisis in Carter Center program areas since the start of the program.3 An explanation of the terms used in these charts is available at our glossary of terms.




What do you get for your dollar?

The Carter Center does not appear to make information available on how much this program spends. In general, independent estimates imply that this type of program is among the most cost-effective. It costs roughly $0.40-$2.50 per year of symptomatic lymphatic filariasis (generally involving swollen limbs and/or scrotum) averted, or $4.40-$29 per disability-adjusted life-year (DALY) averted. Additional information on these figures can be found at our full report on lymphatic filariasis control and our discussion of the DALY metric.

Sources

  • 1.

    "In 2007, 3.4 million mass treatments were distributed to prevent lymphatic filariasis in the two Nigerian states of Plateau and Nasarawa--a remarkable 93 percent of the eligible population. " Carter Center, "Lymphatic Filariasis Elimination Program."

  • 2.

    "The strategy for elimination is based on treating everyone eligible to take the medicine living in an affected community with a dose of two drugs: ivermectin (Mectizan®, donated by Merck & Co., Inc.) and albendazole (donated by GlaxoSmithKline) in sub-Saharan Africa or diethylcarbamazine and albendazole elsewhere." Carter Center, "Lymphatic Filariasis Elimination Program."

  • 3.

    Data sources are as follows:

    • Average Lymphatic Filariasis ICT Results in 10 Sentinel Villages: Carter Center, "Program review for the Carter Center/Lions SightFirst river blindness programs (2008)," Pg viii, Figure F.
    • Average Lymphatic Filariasis ICT Results in Seven Sentinel Villages, Nigeria: Carter Center, "Program review for the Carter Center/Lions SightFirst river blindness programs (2006)," Pg 83, Figure 36.
    • Average Microfilaria Prevalence in 9 Sentinel Villages: Carter Center, "Program review for the Carter Center/Lions SightFirst river blindness programs (2008)," Pg viii, Figure F.
    • Average Mosquito Infection Rates in 9 Sentinel Villages: Carter Center, "Program review for the Carter Center/Lions SightFirst river blindness programs (2008)," Pg viii, Figure F.
    • Nigeria Thick Smear Results: Carter Center, "Program review for the Carter Center/Lions SightFirst river blindness programs (2008)," Pg 79.
    • Small cohort study of 174 permanent residents of the sentinel villages who were tested with ICT in 2004: Carter Center, "Program review for the Carter Center/Lions SightFirst river blindness programs (2008)," Pg 65.
    • The data for the number of people treated:
      • Data on population treated and target population for 2000-2003: Carter Center, "Program Review for The Lions-Carter Center SightFirst River Blindness Programs (2004)," Pg 44 and 47.
      • Data for population treated for 2004: Carter Center, "Program Review for The Lions-Carter Center SightFirst River Blindness Programs (2005)," Pg 53.
      • Data for population treated for 2005: Carter Center, "Program Review for The Lions-Carter Center SightFirst River Blindness Programs (2006)," Pg 88.
      • Data for population treated for 2006: Carter Center, "Program Review for The Lions-Carter Center SightFirst River Blindness Programs (2007)," Pg 65.
      • Data for population treated for 2007: Carter Center, "Program Review for The Lions-Carter Center SightFirst River Blindness Programs (2008)," Pg 77.