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Save the Children as a disaster relief organization: Haiti Earthquake, 2010 (2011 Report)

Where we looked

All of the below was examined in December 2010.

How much did the organization raise and how much did it spend?

Source Dates: Jan 12 2010- Amount raised and committed Amount spent Funding target
Chronicle of Philanthropy1 January 27, 2010 $34.7 million N/A N/A
Chronicle of Philanthropy2 February 3, 2010 $40.0 million N/A N/A
Chronicle of Philanthropy3 February 12, 2010 $65 million N/A N/A
Chronicle of Philanthropy4 February 17, 2010 $66.2 million N/A N/A
Save the Children 3-month report5 April 2010 $60.5 million "Committed for programming through June 2010": $35.5 million $115 million for 2 years
Chronicle of Philanthropy6 May 10, 2010 $60.1 million N/A N/A
Save the Children 6-month report7 July 2010 $71.4 million "Committed $36 million for programming through 2010" $200 million for 5 years8
Chronicle of Philanthropy9 July 9, 2010 $71.4 million $21.9 million N/A
Save the Children 1-year report10 November 30, 2010 $87 million $52.2 million (actual spending through November 2010 plus projected through December 2010) $175 million for 5 years

How specific is the organization about how it spent its funds?

Save the Children reports a break-down of funds spent on each of nine general categories (actual spending through November 2010 plus projected through December 2010).11

Save the Children reports "numbers of people reached" with its activities, and other examples of outputs.12


Non-disaster relief activities

  • In its 2009 annual report, Save the Children gives its expense break-downs in very general categories of aid. Its biggest categories are “emergency, refugee and capacity building" (26%) and education (25%).13 In the report, Save the Children gives examples of its work in these areas. Save the Children's annual reports provide the most detailed descriptions of its activities we have found.
  • In the “What We Do” section of its website, Save the Children provides a description of its its activities in each of the areas in which it works, and further details on where it carries out each of the activities. By examining these descriptions, it is possible to get a general sense of what Save the Children does.14
  • We have not found a comprehensive breakdown of activities, or attribution of funds to activities, at a more detailed level that would allow a specific sense of how much of each activity was conducted (and where).

Sources

  • 1. "Save the Children USA had raised more than $15.5-million as of Wednesday. The organization's international affiliates had raised more than $19.2-million." Chronicle of Philanthropy, “A Roundup of Haiti Fund Raising as of January 29.”
  • 2. "Save the Children USA had raised $16.2-million as of Wednesday. The organization's international affiliates had raised $23.8-million." Chronicle of Philanthropy, “Haiti Donations Exceed $644-Million, as of February 3.”
  • 3.

    "Save the Children USA had raised $17-million as of February 12. The organization's international affiliates had raised $48-million." Chronicle of Philanthropy, “American Charities Raise $709-Million for Haiti Relief, Chronicle Tally Finds.”

  • 4. "Save the Children USA had raised $18.2-million as of February 17. The organization's international affiliates had raised $48-million." Chronicle of Philanthropy, “American Charities Raise $774-Million for Haiti Relief, Chronicle Tally Finds."
  • 5.

    "Funding for 2-Year Earthquake Response and Recovery
    Total Raised: $60.5 Million; Funding target: $115 MILLION." Save the Children, "Helping Haiti's Children: The First Three Months of Save the Children's Earthquake Response," Pg 7.

  • 6. "Save the Children USA had raised more than $25-million as of May 10. As of March, the organization's international affiliates had raised an additional $35.1-million." Chronicle of Philanthropy, “$1.1-Billion Donated for Haiti Relief: Updated Tally (May 11).”
  • 7.

    Save the Children, "Serving Haiti's children now, Rebuilding for the future: Six months after the massive quake," Pg 3.

  • 8.

    "Funding for 5-Year Earthquake Response and Recovery;
    Total Raised AND COMMITTED: $71.4 Million; Funding target: $200 MILLION* ... * Amount assumes one more medium or large emergency over the 5-year period of the strategy." Save the Children, "Serving Haiti's children now, Rebuilding for the future: Six months after the massive quake," Pg 3.

  • 9. "Save the Children--Amount raised: $24,600,000; $71,400,000 worldwide. Amount spent: $21,900,000." Chronicle of Philanthropy, “How Charities Are Helping Haiti: How Much They Raised and Spent.”
  • 10. Save the Children, "Haiti's Children One Year Later: A Country at a Crossroads," Pg 4.
  • 11.

    Save the Children, "Haiti's Children One Year Later: A Country at a Crossroads," Pg 4.

  • 12.

    Save the Children published 3-month, 6-month, and 1-year reports on its activities, containing examples of it's activities and numbers of people reached:

    • 3-month report: Save the Children, "Helping Haiti's Children: The First Three Months of Save the Children's Earthquake Response."
      • 250,00 with food distributions
      • 7,500 with shelter materials and other supplies
      • 221,000 with water and sanitation programs such as drinking water, latrines, and bathing areas
      • 23,000 with medical care
      • 15,000 with "child friendly spaces"
      • 2,500 with cash-for-work programs
    • 6-month report: Save the Children, "Serving Haiti's children now, Rebuilding for the future: Six months after the massive quake," Pg 3.
      • 45,000 students with temporary learning spaces
      • 1,600 teachers with training
      • 230,000 with water and sanitation programs
      • 31,000 families with shelter supplies
    • 1-year report: Save the Children, "Haiti's Children One Year Later: A Country at a Crossroads."
      • 165,000 with medical services
      • 230,000 women and children with nutrition services
      • 2,300 teachers with training
      • 38,500 students with school supplies
      • 300,000 with food distributions
      • 348,000 with water and sanitation programs

    And, this:

    • Water and sanitation: "Since the earthquake, Save the Children has reached nearly 348,000 people with critical water, sanitation and hygiene programs." Save the Children, "Haiti's Children One Year Later: A Country at a Crossroads," Pg 11.
    • Health and nutrition: "Save the Children coordinated with local and international partners to open 80 clinics and nutrition support facilities in areas most affected by the earthquake. As of December 2010, we have reached nearly 165,000 children and adults with medical services and more than 230,000 women and children with nutrition services." Save the Children, "Haiti's Children One Year Later: A Country at a Crossroads," Pg 5.
    • Education:
      • "2,300 teachers received training in disaster risk reduction to be prepared in the event of another earthquake. They also learned positive classroom management practices and how to recognize the psychosocial needs of children, many of whom suffered from anxiety following the earthquake." Save the Children, "Haiti's Children One Year Later: A Country at a Crossroads," Pg 7-8.
      • "School kits including a backpack, notebooks, pencils and other essential supplies were distributed to more than 38,500 children." Save the Children, "Haiti's Children One Year Later: A Country at a Crossroads," Pg 8.
      • "Reopening more than 270 temporary learning spaces in areas that were directly affected by the earthquake, allowing more than 45,000 children to go back to school during the official school period of April–August 2010. Within these temporary spaces, Save the Children has provided equipment, furnishings, more than 2,500 school kits and over 8,300 school bags for children." Save the Children, "Serving Haiti's Children Now, Rebuilding for Their Future," Pg 4-5.
    • Food: "Distributed food to nearly 300,000 children and adults." Save the Children, "Haiti's Children One Year Later: A Country at a Crossroads," Pg 10.
    • Child protection: "To date, of the 4,630 children registered as separated from their families, more than 1,135 children have been reunited with their immediate or extended families through the Family Tracing Network which Save the Children leads." Save the Children, "Haiti's Children One Year Later: A Country at a Crossroads," Pg 9.
  • 13.

    Save the Children, “2009 Annual Report,” Pg 19.

  • 14. Save the Children, “What We Do.”